commensurate

[ kuh-men-ser-it, -sher- ]
/ kəˈmɛn sər ɪt, -ʃər- /

adjective

corresponding in amount, magnitude, or degree: Your paycheck should be commensurate with the amount of time worked.
proportionate; adequate: a solution commensurate to the seriousness of the problem.
having the same measure; of equal extent or duration.
having a common measure or divisor; commensurable.

Nearby words

  1. commendation,
  2. commendatory,
  3. commensal,
  4. commensalism,
  5. commensurable,
  6. comment,
  7. commentariat,
  8. commentary,
  9. commentate,
  10. commentative

Origin of commensurate

1635–45; < Late Latin commēnsūrātus, equivalent to Latin com- com- + mēnsūrātus (past participle of mēnsūrāre to measure); see -ate1

Related forms
Can be confusedcommensurate commiserate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for commensurate


British Dictionary definitions for commensurate

commensurate

/ (kəˈmɛnsərɪt, -ʃə-) /

adjective

having the same extent or duration
corresponding in degree, amount, or size; proportionate
able to be measured by a common standard; commensurable
Derived Formscommensurately, adverbcommensurateness, nouncommensuration (kəˌmɛnsəˈreɪʃən, -ʃə-), noun

Word Origin for commensurate

C17: from Late Latin commēnsūrātus, from Latin com- same + mēnsurāre to measure

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for commensurate

commensurate

adj.

1640s, from Late Latin commensuratus, from Latin com- "with" (see com-) + Late Latin mensuratus, past participle of mensurare "to measure," from mensura (see measure (v.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper