commit

[ kuh-mit ]
/ kəˈmɪt /

verb (used with object), com·mit·ted, com·mit·ting.

verb (used without object), com·mit·ted, com·mit·ting.

to pledge or engage oneself: an athlete who commits to the highest standards.

Origin of commit

1350–1400; Middle English committen (< Anglo-French committer) < Latin committere, equivalent to com- com- + mittere to send, give over
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for commit

British Dictionary definitions for commit

commit

/ (kəˈmɪt) /

verb -mits, -mitting or -mitted (tr)

Derived Formscommittable, adjectivecommitter, noun

Word Origin for commit

C14: from Latin committere to join, from com- together + mittere to put, send
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for commit

commit


v.

late 14c., "to give in charge, entrust," from Latin committere "to unite, connect, combine; to bring together," from com- "together" (see com-) + mittere "to put, send" (see mission). Evolution into modern range of meanings is not entirely clear. Sense of "perpetrating" was ancient in Latin; in English from mid-15c. The intransitive use (in place of commit oneself) first recorded 1982, probably influenced by existentialism use (1948) of commitment to translate Sartre's engagement "emotional and moral engagement."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for commit

commit

[ kə-mĭt ]

v.

To place officially in confinement or custody, as in a mental health facility.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.