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comport

1
[ kuhm-pawrt, -pohrt ]
/ kəmˈpɔrt, -ˈpoʊrt /
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verb (used with object)
to bear or conduct (oneself); behave: He comported himself with dignity.
verb (used without object)
to be in agreement, harmony, or conformity (usually followed by with): His statement does not comport with the facts.
noun
Obsolete. comportment.
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Origin of comport

1
1350–1400; Middle English <Middle French comporter<Latin comportāre to transport, equivalent to com-com- + portāre to port5

Other definitions for comport (2 of 2)

comport2
[ kom-pawrt, -pohrt ]
/ ˈkɒm pɔrt, -poʊrt /

noun
a large English glass dish of the 18th century used for holding fruit or candy and having a wide, shallow top supported by heavy stem and foot; compote.

Origin of comport

2
1765–75; alteration of French compotier a dish for compote; see -ier2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use comport in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for comport

comport
/ (kəmˈpɔːt) /

verb
(tr) to conduct or bear (oneself) in a specified way
(intr foll by with) to agree (with); correspond (to)

Word Origin for comport

C16: from Latin comportāre to bear, collect, from com- together + portāre to carry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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