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corody

or cor·ro·dy

[ kawr-uh-dee, kor- ]
/ ˈkɔr ə di, ˈkɒr- /
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noun, plural cor·o·dies.Old English Law.
a right to receive maintenance in the form of housing, food, or clothing, especially the right enjoyed by the sovereign or a private benefactor to receive such maintenance from a religious house.
the housing, food, or clothing so received.
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Origin of corody

1375–1425; late Middle English corrodie<Anglo-French <Medieval Latin corrōdium outfit, provision, variant of conrēdium<Vulgar Latin *conrēd(āre) to outfit, provide with (equivalent to con-con- + *-rēdāre<Germanic; compare Old English rædan to equip, provide for, ready) + Latin -ium-ium
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for corody

corody

corrody

/ (ˈkɒrədɪ) /

noun plural -dies history
(originally) the right of a lord to receive free quarters from his vassal
an allowance for maintenance

Word Origin for corody

C15: from Medieval Latin corrōdium something provided, from Old French corroyer to provide, of Germanic origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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