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counterpart

[koun-ter-pahrt]
See more synonyms for counterpart on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a person or thing closely resembling another, especially in function: Our president is the counterpart of your prime minister.
  2. a copy; duplicate.
  3. Law. a duplicate or copy of an indenture.
  4. one of two parts that fit, complete, or complement one another.
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Origin of counterpart

late Middle English word dating back to 1425–75; see origin at counter-, part
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for counterpart

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • She was the counterpart of her father; and Doctor Strong had been loved by other men.

    Her Father's Daughter

    Gene Stratton-Porter

  • The three-legged crow in the sun is the counterpart of the three-legged ram-toad in the moon.

  • The line was, "I will accept nothing which all may not have their counterpart of on the same terms."

  • There is a second, I said, which is the counterpart of the one already named.

  • This difference had to have its counterpart in the campaign.

    England and Germany

    Emile Joseph Dillon


British Dictionary definitions for counterpart

counterpart

noun
  1. a person or thing identical to or closely resembling another
  2. one of two parts that complement or correspond to each other
  3. a person acting opposite another in a play
  4. a duplicate, esp of a legal document; copy
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for counterpart

n.

mid-15c., originally countre part "duplicate of a legal document," from Middle French contrepartie, from contre "facing, opposite" (see contra-) + partie "copy of a person or thing," originally fem. past participle of partir "to divide" (see party (n.)).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper