couplet

[ kuhp-lit ]
/ ˈkʌp lɪt /

noun

a pair of successive lines of verse, especially a pair that rhyme and are of the same length.
a pair; couple.
Music. any of the contrasting sections of a rondo occurring between statements of the refrain.

RELATED WORDS

Origin of couplet

From Middle French, dating back to 1570–80; see origin at couple, -et
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for couplet

British Dictionary definitions for couplet

couplet

/ (ˈkʌplɪt) /

noun

two successive lines of verse, usually rhymed and of the same metre

Word Origin for couplet

C16: from French, literally: a little pair; see couple
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for couplet

couplet


n.

1570s, in poetry, from French couplet (mid-14c.), a diminutive of couple (see couple (n.)). In music, from 1876.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Culture definitions for couplet

couplet


A pair of lines of verse that rhyme. Some poems, such as “The Night Before Christmas,” are written entirely in couplets:

`Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse;
The stockings were hung by the chimney with care
In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.