cove

1
[kohv]

noun

verb (used with or without object), coved, cov·ing.

to make or become a cove.

Origin of cove

1
before 900; Middle English; Old English cofa cave, den, closet; cognate with Old Norse kofi hut, Greek gýpē cave
Can be confusedbay cove gulf inlet

cove

2
[kohv]

noun

British Slang. a person; fellow.
Australian Slang. a manager, especially of a sheep station.

Origin of cove

2
1560–70; said to be < Romany kova creature
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for cove

Contemporary Examples of cove

Historical Examples of cove

  • Though the cove was more quiet than the ocean, yet it was fearful enough, even there.

    Malbone

    Thomas Wentworth Higginson

  • I don't like that schooner, Jess, and its ugly crew, lying there in the Cove.

  • Beyond, on the waters of the Cove, the Southern Cross rode at anchor.

  • By the time Dan was put ashore on the beach of the Cove it was afternoon.

  • No cove, no creek even, opened its friendly arms to receive them.

    King Philip

    John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott


British Dictionary definitions for cove

cove

1

noun

a small bay or inlet, usually between rocky headlands
a narrow cavern formed in the sides of cliffs, mountains, etc, usually by erosion
a sheltered place
Also called: coving architect a concave curved surface between the wall and ceiling of a room

verb

(tr) to form an architectural cove in

Word Origin for cove

Old English cofa; related to Old Norse kofi, Old High German kubisi tent

cove

2

noun

old-fashioned, slang, British and Australian a fellow; chap
Australian history an overseer of convict labourers

Word Origin for cove

C16: probably from Romany kova thing, person
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cove
n.1

early 14c., "den, cave," from Old English cofa "small chamber, cell," from Proto-Germanic *kubon (cf. Old High German kubisi "tent, hut," German Koben "pigsty," Old Norse kofi "hut, shed"). Extension of meaning to "small bay" is 1580s, apparently via Scottish dialectal meaning "small hollow place in coastal rocks" (a survival of an Old English secondary sense).

n.2

"fellow, chap," slang from at least 1560s, said to be from Romany (Gypsy) cova "that man."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper