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crux

[ kruhks ]
/ krʌks /
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noun, plural crux·es, cru·ces [kroo-seez]. /ˈkru siz/.
a vital, basic, decisive, or pivotal point: The crux of the trial was his whereabouts at the time of the murder.
a cross.
something that torments by its puzzling nature; a perplexing difficulty.
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Origin of crux

1635–45; <Latin: stake, scaffold, or cross used in executions, torment; figurative senses perhaps <New Latin crux (interpretum) (commentators') torment, a difficult passage in a text; cf. crucial

Other definitions for crux (2 of 2)

Crux
[ kruhks ]
/ krʌks /

noun, genitive Cru·cis [kroo-sis]. /ˈkru sɪs/. Astronomy.

Origin of Crux

<Latin: a cross
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use crux in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for crux (1 of 2)

crux
/ (krʌks) /

noun plural cruxes or cruces (ˈkruːsiːz)
a vital or decisive stage, point, etc (often in the phrase the crux of the matter)
a baffling problem or difficulty
mountaineering the most difficult and often decisive part of a climb or pitch
a rare word for cross

Word Origin for crux

C18: from Latin: cross

British Dictionary definitions for crux (2 of 2)

Crux
/ (krʌks) /

noun Latin genitive Crucis (ˈkruːsɪs)
the more formal name for the Southern Cross
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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