darken

[ dahr-kuhn ]
/ ˈdɑr kən /
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verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

Idioms

    darken someone's door, to come to visit; make an appearance: Never darken my door again!

Origin of darken

First recorded in 1250–1300, darken is from the Middle English word derknen. See dark, -en1
Related formsdark·en·er, nounun·dark·en, verb (used with object)well-dark·ened, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for darken

British Dictionary definitions for darken

darken

/ (ˈdɑːkən) /

verb

to make or become dark or darker
to make or become gloomy, angry, or sadhis mood darkened
darken someone's door (usually used with a negative) to visit someonenever darken my door again!
Derived Formsdarkener, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for darken

darken


v.

c. 1300, "to make dark;" late 14c., "to become dark," from dark (adj.) + -en (1). The more usual verb in Middle English was simply dark, as it is in Chaucer and Shakespeare, and darken did not predominate until 17c. The Anglo-Saxons also had a verb sweorcan meaning "to grow dark." To darken someone's door (usually with a negative) is attested from 1729.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper