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View synonyms for deficit

deficit

[ def-uh-sit; British also dih-fis-it ]

noun

  1. the amount by which a sum of money falls short of the required amount.
  2. the amount by which expenditures or liabilities exceed income or assets.
  3. a lack or shortage; deficiency.
  4. a disadvantage, impairment, or handicap:

    The team's major deficit is its poor pitching.

  5. a loss, as in the operation of a business.


deficit

/ ˈdɛfɪsɪt; dɪˈfɪsɪt /

noun

  1. the amount by which an actual sum is lower than that expected or required
    1. an excess of liabilities over assets
    2. an excess of expenditures over revenues during a certain period
    3. an excess of payments over receipts on the balance of payments


deficit

  1. A shortage, especially the amount by which a sum of money falls short of what is required; a debt .


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Other Words From

  • super·defi·cit noun

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Word History and Origins

Origin of deficit1

First recorded in 1775–85; from Latin dēficit “(it) lacks,” 3rd-person singular present of dēficere “to fail, run short, lack, weaken”; deficient

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Word History and Origins

Origin of deficit1

C18: from Latin, literally: there is lacking, from dēficere to be lacking

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Example Sentences

It’s also a country with a more quickly increasing deficit, given the extent to which blue states often pay more in taxes than they receive in services.

A few days ago I wrote down a few notes making a bullish case for Palantir, searching to find good news amidst the company’s huge historical deficits.

There is no indication, however, that southpaws produce superior movement, even partially, to offset their velocity deficit.

The Federal Reserve has agreed with Democrats now is not the time to worry about the federal deficit if we are to see our economy recover once the pandemic has eased.

It should not be overlooked that the housing component of Complete Communities, which encourages higher density in park-deficient urban communities, only exacerbates the deficit.

“ADD [Attention Deficit Disorder] is just a euphemistic way of saying, ‘I have limits,’” Brown writes.

Averell Harriman [governor from 1955 to 1958] left behind a pretty significant deficit.

The deficit is down to 2.8 percent of GDP, from a high of 10.1 percent in the wake of the meltdown.

Then he faced a $3.7 billion deficit, the largest in state history, and the largest per capita in the nation.

Nor is the deficit, which has lost its saliency since it was cut in half to $500 billion.

Any delay in covering such deficit shall be subject to such charge as the Federal Reserve Board may impose.

The purchaser bought supposing that there was no such deficit, but perhaps a small one, what would a court do?

But we can hire the old hall, and all the men will be glad to subscribe—a few of us can make up the deficit.

The weekly deficit continued, appalling, palpable even to Jane; but she made it up secretly.

But that due must be paid, not out of deficit, but out of surplus.

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deficient numberdeficit financing