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demurrage

[ dih-mur-ij ]

noun

, Commerce.
  1. the detention in port of a vessel by the shipowner, as in loading or unloading, beyond the time allowed or agreed upon.
  2. the similar undue detention of a railroad car, truck, etc.
  3. a charge for such undue detention.


demurrage

/ dɪˈmʌrɪdʒ /

noun

  1. the delaying of a ship, railway wagon, etc, caused by the charterer's failure to load, unload, etc, before the time of scheduled departure
  2. the extra charge required as compensation for such delay
  3. a fee charged by the Bank of England for changing bullion into notes


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Word History and Origins

Origin of demurrage1

First recorded in 1635–45; demur + -age
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Word History and Origins

Origin of demurrage1

C17: from Old French demorage, demourage; see demur
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Example Sentences

Some were "refund of terminal charges;" some were "lighterage demurrage;" some were allowances for damages.

You dont think therell be any such bill as that for repairs and demurrage on McLaughlins hulk, do you?

I reckoned maybe fifty dollars would pay demurrage and repairs on Mac.

The freight of that ship too calls for an enormous sum, on account of her long demurrage.

"We've decided to charge the demurrage and other expenses and loss to Tui Tulifau," Grief said.

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demuredemurral