designate

[ verb dez-ig-neyt; adjective dez-ig-nit, -neyt ]
/ verb ˈdɛz ɪgˌneɪt; adjective ˈdɛz ɪg nɪt, -ˌneɪt /

verb (used with object), des·ig·nat·ed, des·ig·nat·ing.

to mark or point out; indicate; show; specify.
to denote; indicate; signify.
to name; entitle; style.
to nominate or select for a duty, office, purpose, etc.; appoint; assign.

adjective

named or selected for an office, position, etc., but not yet installed (often used in combination following the noun it modifies): ambassador-designate.

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Origin of designate

1640–50; <Latin dēsignātus, past participle of dēsignāre.See design, -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM designate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for designate

British Dictionary definitions for designate

designate

verb (ˈdɛzɪɡˌneɪt) (tr)

to indicate or specify
to give a name to; style; entitle
to select or name for an office or duty; appoint

adjective (ˈdɛzɪɡnɪt, -ˌneɪt)

(immediately postpositive) appointed, but not yet in officea minister designate

Derived forms of designate

designative or designatory (ˌdɛzɪɡˈneɪtrɪ), adjectivedesignator, noun

Word Origin for designate

C15: from Latin dēsignātus marked out, defined; see design
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012