Nearby words

  1. marivaux, pierre carlet de chamblain de,
  2. mariánské lázně,
  3. marjolaine,
  4. marjoram,
  5. marjory,
  6. mark antony,
  7. mark down,
  8. mark my words,
  9. mark of the beast,
  10. mark time

Idioms

Origin of mark

1
before 900; (noun) Middle English; Old English mearc mark, sign, banner, dividing line, borderland; cognate with German Mark borderland, unit of weight, Old Norse mǫrk forest (orig., borderland), unit of weight, Gothic marka boundary, borderland, Latin margō margin; (v.) Middle English marken, Old English mearcian; cognate with Old Frisian merkia, Old High German marchōn, Old Norse marka to plan

mark

2
[ mahrk ]
/ mɑrk /

noun

the monetary unit of Germany from 1871 to 2002, when the euro was adopted: originally a silver coin.Compare Deutsche mark, ostmark, reichsmark.
the markka of Finland.
Also merk. a former silver coin of Scotland, equal to 13s. 4d.
a former money of account of England, equal to 13s. 4d.
a former coin of Estonia, the 1/100 part of a kroon: replaced by the sent after 1927.
a former European unit of weight, especially for gold and silver, generally equal to 8 ounces (249 grams).

Origin of mark

2
before 900; Middle English; Old English marc unit of weight < Medieval Latin marca < Germanic; see mark1

Mark

[ mahrk ]
/ mɑrk /

noun

one of the four Evangelists: traditionally believed to be the author of the second Gospel.
the second Gospel: to read aloud from Mark.
King, Arthurian Romance. ruler of Cornwall, husband of Iseult and uncle of Sir Tristram.
Saint. Marcus, Saint.
a male given name, form of Marcus.

Hanna

[ han-uh ]
/ ˈhæn ə /

noun

Marcus AlonzoMark, 1837–1904, U.S. merchant and politician: senator 1897–1904.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for mark


British Dictionary definitions for mark

mark

1
/ (mɑːk) /

noun

verb

interjection

rugby Union the shout given by a player when calling for a mark
See also markdown, mark-up

Word Origin for mark

Old English mearc mark; related to Old Norse mörk boundary land, Old High German marha boundary, Latin margō margin

noun

a former monetary unit and coin in England and Scotland worth two thirds of a pound sterling
a silver coin of Germany until 1924

Word Origin for mark

Old English marc unit of weight of precious metal, perhaps from the marks on metal bars; apparently of Germanic origin and related to mark 1

Mark

/ (mɑːk) /

noun New Testament

one of the four Evangelists. Feast day: April 25
the second Gospel, traditionally ascribed to him

Hanna

/ (ˈhænə) /

noun

William. 1910–2001, US animator and film producer who with Joseph Barbera (1911–2006) created the cartoon characters Tom and Jerry in the 1940s; the Hanna–Barbera company later produced numerous cartoon series for television.
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for mark
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for mark

mark

[ märk ]

n.

A spot or line on a surface, visible through difference in color or elevation from that of the surrounding area.
A distinctive trait or property.

v.

To make a visible trace or impression on, as occurs with a spot or dent.
To form, make, or depict by making a mark.
To distinguish or characterize.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with mark

mark

In addition to the idioms beginning with mark

  • mark down
  • marked man, a
  • mark my words
  • mark time
  • mark up

also see:

  • beside the point (mark)
  • black mark
  • give bad marks to
  • high-water mark
  • hit the bull's-eye (mark)
  • make one's mark
  • off the mark
  • quick off the mark
  • toe the line (mark)
  • up to par (the mark)
  • wide of the mark
  • x marks the spot
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.