Dictionary.com

dextran

[ dek-struhn ]
/ ˈdɛk strən /
Save This Word!

noun Chemistry, Pharmacology.
a viscous polysaccharide, composed of dextrose, produced by bacterial action on sucrose: used in confections and lacquers and in medicine chiefly as an extender for blood plasma.
QUIZ
ARE YOU A TRUE BLUE CHAMPION OF THESE "BLUE" SYNONYMS?
We could talk until we're blue in the face about this quiz on words for the color "blue," but we think you should take the quiz and find out if you're a whiz at these colorful terms.
Question 1 of 8
Which of the following words describes “sky blue”?
Meet Grammar CoachWrite or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing
Meet Grammar CoachImprove Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of dextran

First recorded in 1875–80; dextr(ose) + an(hydride)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use dextran in a sentence

  • Lichenin, para dextran, and para isodextran are dextrosans which have been isolated from various lower plants.

    The Chemistry of Plant Life|Roscoe Wilfred Thatcher

British Dictionary definitions for dextran

dextran
/ (ˈdɛkstrən) /

noun
biochem a polysaccharide produced by the action of bacteria on sucrose: used as a substitute for plasma in blood transfusions

Word Origin for dextran

C19: from dextro- + -an
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for dextran

dextran
[ dĕkstrăn′, -strən ]

n.
Any of a group of long-chain polymers of glucose with various molecular weights that are used in isotonic sodium chloride solution for the treatment of shock, in distilled water for the relief of the edema of nephrosis, and as plasma volume expanders.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
FEEDBACK