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diamond

[ dahy-muhnd, dahy-uh- ]
/ ˈdaɪ mənd, ˈdaɪ ə- /
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noun

adjective

verb (used with object)

to adorn with or as if with diamonds.

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QUIZ YOURSELF ON “THEIR,” “THERE,” AND “THEY’RE”

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Question 1 of 7
Which one of these commonly confused words can act as an adverb or a pronoun?

Idioms for diamond

    diamond in the rough, a person of fine character but lacking refined manners or graces.

Origin of diamond

1275–1325; Middle English diamant<Old French <Vulgar Latin *diamant-, stem of *diamas, perhaps alteration of *adimas (>French aimant magnet, Old Provençal aziman diamond, magnet), for Latin adamasadamant, diamond

OTHER WORDS FROM diamond

dia·mond·like, adjective

Definition for diamond (2 of 2)

Diamond
[ dahy-muhnd, dahy-uh- ]
/ ˈdaɪ mənd, ˈdaɪ ə- /

noun

Neil, born 1941, U.S. singer and songwriter.
Cape, a hill in Canada, in S Quebec, on the St. Lawrence River.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for diamond

British Dictionary definitions for diamond

diamond
/ (ˈdaɪəmənd) /

noun

verb

(tr) to decorate with or as with diamonds

Derived forms of diamond

diamond-like, adjective

Word Origin for diamond

C13: from Old French diamant, from Medieval Latin diamas, modification of Latin adamas the hardest iron or steel, diamond; see adamant
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for diamond

diamond
[ dīə-mənd ]

A form of pure carbon that occurs naturally as a clear, cubic crystal and is the hardest of all known minerals. It often occurs as octahedrons with rounded edges and curved surfaces. Diamond forms under conditions of extreme temperature and pressure and is most commonly found in volcanic breccias and in alluvial deposits. Poorly formed diamonds are used in abrasives and in industrial cutting tools.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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