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diphtheria

[ dif-theer-ee-uh, dip- ]

noun

, Pathology.
  1. a febrile, infectious disease caused by the bacillus Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and characterized by the formation of a false membrane in the air passages, especially the throat.


diphtheria

/ dɪpˈθɛrɪk; ˌdɪpθəˈrɪtɪk; dɪf-; dɪpˈθɪərɪə; dɪf-; dɪf- /

noun

  1. an acute contagious disease caused by the bacillus Corynebacterium diphtheriae, producing fever, severe prostration, and difficulty in breathing and swallowing as the result of swelling of the throat and formation of a false membrane


diphtheria

/ dĭf-thîrē-ə,dĭp- /

  1. An infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae and characterized by fever, swollen glands, and the formation of a membrane in the throat that prevents breathing. Infants are routinely vaccinated against diphtheria, which was once a common cause of death in children.


diphtheria

  1. An acute disease , and a contagious disease , caused by bacteria that invade mucous membranes in the body, especially those found in the throat. The bacteria produce toxic substances that can spread throughout the body.


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Notes

In developed countries, diphtheria has been virtually wiped out through an active program of infant immunization .

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Derived Forms

  • diphˈtherial, adjective
  • ˈdiphtheˌroid, adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of diphtheria1

1850–55; < New Latin < French diphthérie < Greek diphthér ( a ) skin, leather + -ia -ia

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Word History and Origins

Origin of diphtheria1

C19: New Latin, from French diphthérie, from Greek diphthera leather; from the nature of the membrane

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Example Sentences

By the early 20th century, vaccination was commonplace against infections such as smallpox, tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis.

About one-fifth of children died before reaching age 5, many from infectious diseases such as diphtheria that are now preventable with vaccines.

From Time

The dread of many other childhood illnesses, such as diphtheria and measles, has also diminished, leaving some to take prevention measures for granted.

Some vaccines are required for school entry in every state — measles, polio, diphtheria — because they have extremely high efficacy rates and are related to diseases that spread through normal daily contact with other kids in schools.

For example, the flu vaccine needs a booster every year, and the diphtheria and tetanus vaccine every 10 years.

One of his brothers died of diphtheria during the Nazi siege of Leningrad in World War II.

Diphtheria, on the other hand, is perfectly capable of causing an outbreak in a vulnerable population.

Thankfully, diphtheria has been essentially eliminated in the United States.

Instead, the concerns reflect the fact that unlike measles or diphtheria or rubella, HPV is not spread by casual contact.

His optimism led him to compare ending poverty to eradicating scarlet fever and diphtheria.

Fibrinous casts are characteristic of fibrinous bronchitis, but may also be found in diphtheria of the smaller bronchi.

A germ flies from a stagnant pool, and the laughing child, its mother's darling, dies dreadfully of diphtheria.

Pseudomembranous conjunctivitis generally shows either streptococci or diphtheria bacilli.

So long as Christians have an overwhelming majority who will not touch the drains, diphtheria must continue.

School-children at times have what appears to be mere sore throat but which is really diphtheria in the naturally immune.

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