disadvantage

[ dis-uhd-van-tij, -vahn- ]
/ ˌdɪs ədˈvæn tɪdʒ, -ˈvɑn- /

noun

absence or deprivation of advantage or equality.
the state or an instance of being in an unfavorable circumstance or condition: to be at a disadvantage.
something that puts one in an unfavorable position or condition: His bad temper is a disadvantage.
injury to interest, reputation, credit, profit, etc.; loss: Your behavior is a disadvantage to your family's good name.

verb (used with object), dis·ad·van·taged, dis·ad·van·tag·ing.

to subject to disadvantage: I was disadvantaged by illness.

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Origin of disadvantage

1350–1400; Middle English disavauntage < Anglo-French; Old French desavantage. See dis-1, advantage
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for disadvantage

British Dictionary definitions for disadvantage

disadvantage
/ (ˌdɪsədˈvɑːntɪdʒ) /

noun

an unfavourable circumstance, state of affairs, thing, person, etc
injury, loss, or detriment
an unfavourable condition or situation (esp in the phrase at a disadvantage)

verb

(tr) to put at a disadvantage; handicap
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012