discourage

[ dih-skur-ij, -skuhr- ]
/ dɪˈskɜr ɪdʒ, -ˈskʌr- /

verb (used with object), dis·cour·aged, dis·cour·ag·ing.

to deprive of courage, hope, or confidence; dishearten; dispirit.
to dissuade (usually followed by from).
to obstruct by opposition or difficulty; hinder: Low prices discourage industry.
to express or make clear disapproval of; frown upon: to discourage the expression of enthusiasm.

verb (used without object), dis·cour·aged, dis·cour·ag·ing.

to become discouraged: a person who discourages easily.

Origin of discourage

1400–50; late Middle English discoragen < Middle French descorager, Old French descoragier. See dis-1, courage

OTHER WORDS FROM discourage

synonym study for discourage

1. Discourage, dismay, intimidate mean to dishearten or frighten. To discourage is to dishearten by expressing disapproval or by suggesting that a contemplated action or course will probably fail: He was discouraged from going into business. To dismay is to dishearten completely: Her husband's philandering dismayed her. To intimidate is to frighten, as by threats of force, violence, or dire consequences: to intimidate a witness.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for discouraged

British Dictionary definitions for discouraged

discourage
/ (dɪsˈkʌrɪdʒ) /

verb (tr)

to deprive of the will to persist in something
to inhibit; preventthis solution discourages rust
to oppose by expressing disapproval

Derived forms of discourage

discouragement, noundiscourager, noundiscouragingly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012