dispirited

[dih-spir-i-tid]
See more synonyms for dispirited on Thesaurus.com

Origin of dispirited

First recorded in 1640–50; dispirit + -ed2
Related formsdis·pir·it·ed·ly, adverbdis·pir·it·ed·ness, noun

dispirit

[dih-spir-it]
verb (used with object)
  1. to deprive of spirit, hope, enthusiasm, etc.; depress; discourage; dishearten.

Origin of dispirit

First recorded in 1635–45; di-2 + spirit
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for dispirited

Contemporary Examples of dispirited

Historical Examples of dispirited

  • Dilly looked at this product of the patient art of woman with a dispirited gaze.

    Meadow Grass

    Alice Brown

  • He was sad and dispirited, and ill at ease with his own heart.

    Barrington

    Charles James Lever

  • Conyers sat alone in his barrack-room, very sad and dispirited.

    Barrington

    Charles James Lever

  • He did not so much brood as rage inwardly in a dull, dispirited way.

    The Rescue

    Joseph Conrad

  • "Well don't be dispirited," said Lorand, drawing me towards him and embracing me.

    Debts of Honor

    Maurus Jkai


British Dictionary definitions for dispirited

dispirited

adjective
  1. low in spirit or enthusiasm; downhearted or depressed; discouraged
Derived Formsdispiritedly, adverbdispiritedness, noun

dispirit

verb
  1. (tr) to lower the spirit or enthusiasm of; make downhearted or depressed; discourage
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for dispirited

dispirit

v.

1640s; see dis- + spirit (n.). Related: Dispirited; dispiriting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper