Dictionary.com

distrust

[ dis-truhst ]
/ dɪsˈtrʌst /
Save This Word!
See synonyms for: distrust / distrusted / distrusting on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object)
to regard with doubt or suspicion; have no trust in.
noun
lack of trust; doubt; suspicion.

VIDEO FOR DISTRUST

What's The Difference Between "Mistrust" And "Distrust"?

Did you know there was a difference between the words mistrust and distrust? Yea, we didn't either. Watch Emmy explain ...

MORE VIDEOS FROM DICTIONARY.COM
QUIZ
FIRE UP YOUR VOCAB FOR A "RED" SYNONYMS QUIZ
No fire engine reds here, only a fierce collection of vibrant words for the color red to test yourself on.
Question 1 of 7
What does "amaranth" mean?
Meet Grammar CoachWrite or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing
Meet Grammar CoachImprove Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of distrust

First recorded in 1505–15; dis-1 + trust

synonym study for distrust

2. See suspicion.

OTHER WORDS FROM distrust

dis·trust·er, nounpre·dis·trust, noun, verb (used with object)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

DISTRUST VS. MISTRUST

What’s the difference between distrust and mistrust?

As nouns, distrust and mistrust mean just about the same thing: doubt or suspicion—a lack of trust.

As verbs, they are also often used interchangeably to mean to regard someone with suspicion—to not trust them.

Some people think that there is a subtle difference in what each word implies. Distrust, they say, implies that there is a strong reason for the lack of trust—that it’s based on something that a person has already done. Mistrust, on the other hand, is said to be based on suspicion, as opposed to having a basis in someone’s past actions.

This may be what some people intend to imply when they use each word, but, still, most people use the two of them in just about the same way. Distrust is the more commonly used of the two. The adjective distrustful is also more common than mistrustful.

Here are some examples of distrust and mistrust used correctly in a sentence. In both cases, the other word could be swapped in without changing the meaning.

Example: I have a deep mistrust of landlords. 

Example: She has distrusted me ever since I lost her book—and I think her distrust of me has grown since then. 

Want to learn more? Read the full breakdown of the difference between distrust and mistrust.

Quiz yourself on distrust vs. mistrust!

True or False? 

Distrust is only ever a verb, while mistrust is only ever a noun.

How to use distrust in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for distrust

distrust
/ (dɪsˈtrʌst) /

verb
to regard as untrustworthy or dishonest
noun
suspicion; doubt

Derived forms of distrust

distruster, noundistrustful, adjectivedistrustfully, adverbdistrustfulness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK