dogy

[ doh-gee ]
/ ˈdoʊ gi /

noun, plural do·gies.


Nearby words

  1. dogvane,
  2. dogwatch,
  3. dogwood,
  4. dogwood family,
  5. dogwood winter,
  6. doh,
  7. doha,
  8. dohc,
  9. dohnányi,
  10. dohnányi, ernst von

dogie

or do·gey, do·gy

[ doh-gee ]
/ ˈdoʊ gi /

noun Western U.S.

a motherless calf in a cattle herd.

Origin of dogie

1885–90, Americanism; origin obscure; alleged to be doughg(uts) + -ie

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for dogy

  • Do you think for a minute we can stop to drive a dogy all the way to Grub Stake?

    The Trail Boys on the Plains|Jay Winthrop Allen
  • Mrs. Elkins, havin' pulled him through his own dogy stage, dropped out of the cow business, an' devoted herself to kids.

    Yellowstone Nights|Herbert Quick
  • And like the dogy, I didn't run across anything that looked natural or inviting.

    The Happy Family|Bertha Muzzy Bower


British Dictionary definitions for dogy

dogy

/ (ˈdəʊɡɪ) /

noun plural -gies

a variant spelling of dogie

dogie

dogy or dogey

/ (ˈdəʊɡɪ) /

noun plural -gies or -geys

Western US and Canadian a motherless calf

Word Origin for dogie

C19: from dough-guts, because they were fed on flour and water paste

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for dogy

dogie

n.

"motherless calf in a herd," 1887, cowboy slang, of uncertain origin.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper