dooms

[ doomz ]
/ dumz /

adverb Scot. and North England.

very; extremely: used as a euphemism for damned.

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Origin of dooms

First recorded in 1805–15; doom + -s1

Definition for dooms (2 of 2)

doom
[ doom ]
/ dum /

noun

verb (used with object)

Origin of doom

before 900; Middle English dome, dōm, Old English dōm judgment, law; cognate with Old Norse dōmr, Gothic dōms; compare Sanskrit dhā́man, Greek thémis law; see do1, deem

SYNONYMS FOR doom

1 See fate.
3 condemnation.
6 predestine.

OTHER WORDS FROM doom

doom·y, adjectivepre·doom, verb (used with object)self-doomed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for dooms

British Dictionary definitions for dooms

doom
/ (duːm) /

noun

death or a terrible fate
a judgment or decision
(sometimes capital) another term for the Last Judgment

verb

(tr) to destine or condemn to death or a terrible fate

Word Origin for doom

Old English dōm; related to Old Norse dōmr judgment, Gothic dōms sentence, Old High German tuom condition, Greek thomos crowd, Sanskrit dhāman custom; see do 1, deem, deed, -dom
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012