dove

1
[ duhv ]
/ dʌv /

noun

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Origin of dove

1
First recorded in 1150–1200; Middle English; Old English dūfe- (in dūfedoppa “dip-diver”); cognate with Dutch duif, German Taube, Old Norse dūfa, Gothic dūbo, originally, “a diver”

OTHER WORDS FROM dove

dove·like, dov·ish, adjective

Definition for dove (2 of 3)

dove2
[ dohv ]
/ doʊv /

verb

a simple past tense of dive.

Definition for dove (3 of 3)

Dove
[ duhv ]
/ dʌv /

noun

Arthur, 1880–1946, U.S. painter.
Rita, born 1952, U.S. poet and educator: U.S. poet laureate 1993.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for dove

British Dictionary definitions for dove (1 of 3)

dove1
/ (dʌv) /

noun

any of various birds of the family Columbidae, having a heavy body, small head, short legs, and long pointed wings: order Columbiformes. They are typically smaller than pigeonsRelated adjective: columbine
politics a person opposed to warCompare hawk 1 (def. 3)
a gentle or innocent person: used as a term of endearment
  1. a greyish-brown colour
  2. (as adjective)dove walls

Derived forms of dove

dovelike, adjectivedovish, adjective

Word Origin for dove

Old English dūfe (unattested except as a feminine proper name); related to Old Saxon dūbva, Old High German tūba

British Dictionary definitions for dove (2 of 3)

dove2
/ (dəʊv) /

verb

mainly US a past tense of dive

British Dictionary definitions for dove (3 of 3)

Dove
/ (dʌv) /

noun

the Dove Christianity a manifestation of the Holy Spirit (John 1:32)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012