drop-off

[ drop-awf, -of ]
/ ˈdrɒpˌɔf, -ˌɒf /

noun

a vertical or very steep descent: The trail has a drop-off of several hundred feet.
a decline; decrease: Sales have shown a considerable drop-off this year.
a place where a person or thing can be left, received, accommodated, etc.: a new drop-off for outpatients.

adjective

applied when a rented vehicle is left elsewhere than at the point of hire: to pay a drop-off charge.

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Origin of drop-off

First recorded in 1955–60; noun, adj. use of verb phrase drop off
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for drop-off

British Dictionary definitions for drop-off

drop off

verb (adverb)

(intr) to grow smaller or less; decline
(tr) to allow to alight; set down
(intr) informal to fall asleep

noun drop-off

a steep or vertical descent
a sharp decrease
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with drop-off

drop off

1

Fall asleep, as in When I looked at Grandma, she had dropped off. [Early 1800s]

2

Decrease; also, become less frequent. For example, Sales have dropped off markedly, or Over the year her visits dropped off. [Early 1800s]

3

Deliver, unload, as in Bill dropped off the package at the office.

4

Die, as in He is so ill he could drop off any time. [Early 1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.