due

[doo, dyoo]

adjective

noun

something that is due, owed, or naturally belongs to someone.
Usually dues. a regular fee or charge payable at specific intervals, especially to a group or organization: membership dues.

adverb

directly or exactly: a due east course.
Obsolete. duly.

Nearby words

  1. dudley,
  2. dudley, robert,
  3. dudley, thomas,
  4. dudleya,
  5. duds,
  6. due bill,
  7. due diligence,
  8. due process,
  9. due process of law,
  10. due to

Idioms

Origin of due

1275–1325; Middle English < Anglo-French; Middle French deu, past participle of devoir < Latin dēbēre to owe; see debt

Related formsdue·ness, noun

Can be confuseddew do due

Usage note

11. Due to as a prepositional phrase meaning “because of, owing to” has been in use since the 14th century: Due to the sudden rainstorm, the picnic was moved indoors. Some object to this use on the grounds that due is historically an adjective and thus should be used only predicatively in constructions like The delay was due to electrical failure. Despite such objections, due to occurs commonly as a compound preposition and is standard in all varieties of speech and writing.

Pronunciation note

See new.

a due

[ah doo-ey; Italian ah doo-e]

adjective Music.

together; in unison.

Origin of a due

< Italian: literally, by two

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for due


British Dictionary definitions for due

due

adjective

(postpositive) immediately payable
(postpositive) owed as a debt, irrespective of any date for payment
requisite; fitting; proper
(prenominal) adequate or sufficient; enough
(postpositive) expected or appointed to be present or arrivethe train is now due
due to attributable to or caused by

noun

something that is owed, required, or due
give a person his due to give or allow a person what is deserved or right

adverb

directly or exactly; straighta course due west
See also dues

Word Origin for due

C13: from Old French deu, from devoir to owe, from Latin debēre; see debt, debit

usage

The use of due to as a compound preposition (the performance has been cancelled due to bad weather) was formerly considered incorrect, but is now acceptable

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for due

due

adj.

early 14c., "customary, regular;" mid-14c., "owing, payable," from Old French deu, past participle of devoir "to owe," from Latin debere "to owe" (see debt).

In reference to points of the compass (e.g. due east) it is attested from c.1600, originally nautical, from notion of "fitting, rightful." As an adverb from 1590s; as a noun from early 15c. Prepositional phrase due to (much maligned by grammarians) is from 1897.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with due

due

In addition to the idiom beginning with due

  • due to

also see:

  • give credit (where it's due)
  • give someone his or her due
  • give the devil his due
  • in due course
  • pay one's dues
  • with all due respect
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.