duster

[duhs-ter]

noun


Origin of duster

First recorded in 1570–80; dust + -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for duster

Historical Examples of duster

  • He has all his housework there, a broom and a duster, and I dare say he has a cooking-stove and a gridiron.

    Malbone

    Thomas Wentworth Higginson

  • Ilona in the best bedroom was busy as usual with duster and brush.

    A Bride of the Plains

    Baroness Emmuska Orczy

  • She turned as she spoke, and busied herself with a duster where there was no need for it.

  • He put on his hat and duster and he delivered the letter to Garcia.

    Dollars and Sense

    Col. Wm. C. Hunter

  • When I go near the rubbish with my duster he trembles like an aspen.

    White Lies

    Charles Reade



British Dictionary definitions for duster

duster

noun

a cloth used for dusting furniture, etcUS name: dust cloth
a machine for blowing out dust over trees or crops
a person or thing that dusts
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for duster
n.

1570s, "dust brush for clothes," agent noun from dust (v.). Meaning "sifter" is from 1660s; that of "cloth worn to keep off dust" is from 1864.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper