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View synonyms for eddy

eddy

1

[ ed-ee ]

noun

, plural ed·dies.
  1. a current at variance with the main current in a stream of liquid or gas, especially one having a rotary or whirling motion.
  2. a small whirlpool.
  3. any similar current, as of air, dust, or fog.
  4. a current or trend, as of opinion or events, running counter to the main current.


verb (used with or without object)

, ed·died, ed·dy·ing.
  1. to move or whirl in eddies.

Eddy

2

[ ed-ee ]

noun

  1. Mary (Morse) Baker Mrs. GloverMrs. Patterson, 1821–1910, U.S. founder of the Christian Science Church.
  2. Also Eddie. a male given name, form of Edgar or Edward.

Eddy

1

/ ˈɛdɪ /

noun

  1. EddyMary Baker18211910FUSRELIGION: religious leaderRELIGION: Christian Scientist Mary Baker. 1821–1910, US religious leader; founder of the Christian Science movement (1866)


eddy

2

/ ˈɛdɪ /

noun

  1. a movement in a stream of air, water, or other fluid in which the current doubles back on itself causing a miniature whirlwind or whirlpool
  2. a deviation from or disturbance in the main trend of thought, life, etc, esp one that is relatively unimportant

verb

  1. to move or cause to move against the main current

eddy

/ ĕdē /

  1. A current, as of water or air, moving in a direction that is different from that of the main current. Eddies generally involve circular motion; unstable patterns of eddies are often called turbulence .
  2. See also vortex


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Other Words From

  • un·eddied adjective
  • un·eddy·ing adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of eddy1

1425–75; late Middle English; Old English ed- turning + ēa water; akin to Old Norse itha

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Word History and Origins

Origin of eddy1

C15: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse itha; related to Old English ed- again, back, Old High German it-

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Example Sentences

Growing up, Eddy often cut through Oaklawn Cemetery on his way to his aunt’s house.

Returning to Oaklawn in his 80s, Eddy showed investigators where he’d seen the trench as a boy.

We like to think of Quartz as an eddy in that river of news, a spot of relative calm where you’ll find only the most important and interesting stuff.

From Quartz

“Given the projected pollution for the Permian Basin, it is quite literally a global climate bomb that will lead us to catastrophe if we fail to adjust our trajectory away from fossil fuels,” Eddy said.

Four years later, as a junior in college, after a morning swirling in yet another eddy of food-obsessed thoughts, I finally reached a breaking point.

Now 18, Ammons was a friend of Skylar Neese and a friend of one of her killers, Shelia Eddy.

Jean François Bruel, executive chef at Daniel, and Eddy Leroux, chef de cuisine, in particular.

This hurly-burly,” said he, drawing her into a quiet eddy of the stream, “is no place for the communion of two twin souls.

A dangerous eddy was barely avoided, but beyond and directly in their path a ragged rock appeared.

This family had an immense capacity for disapproval; it was awful, as Eddy had observed, for not liking people.

He felt himself caught in a mighty eddy, bearing he knew not whither; he, one wavelet amid the sea's myriads.

Well, I can—look at that bend where the round pebbles are collected so; there was a strong eddy there.

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