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View synonyms for egg

egg

1

[ eg ]

noun

  1. the roundish reproductive body produced by the female of certain animals, as birds and most reptiles, consisting of an ovum and its envelope of albumen, jelly, membranes, egg case, or shell, according to species.
  2. such a body produced by a domestic bird, especially the hen.
  3. the contents of an egg or eggs: fried eggs.

    raw egg;

    fried eggs.

  4. anything resembling a hen's egg.
  5. Also called egg cell. the female gamete; ovum.
  6. Informal. person:

    He's a good egg.

  7. Slang. an aerial bomb.


verb (used with object)

  1. to prepare (food) by dipping in beaten egg.

egg

2

[ eg ]

verb (used with object)

  1. to incite or urge; encourage (usually followed by on ).

egg

1

/ ɛɡ /

noun

  1. the oval or round reproductive body laid by the females of birds, reptiles, fishes, insects, and some other animals, consisting of a developing embryo, its food store, and sometimes jelly or albumen, all surrounded by an outer shell or membrane
  2. Also calledegg cell any female gamete; ovum
  3. the egg of the domestic hen used as food
  4. something resembling an egg, esp in shape or in being in an early stage of development
  5. bad egg old-fashioned.
    bad egg
    1. a bad person
    2. an exclamation of dismay
  6. good egg old-fashioned.
    good egg
    1. a good person
    2. an exclamation of delight
  7. lay an egg slang.
    lay an egg
    1. to make a joke or give a performance, etc, that fails completely
    2. (of a joke, performance, etc) to fail completely; flop
  8. put all one's eggs in one basket
    put all one's eggs in one baskethave all one's eggs in one basket to stake everything on a single venture
  9. teach one's grandmother to suck eggs
    teach one's grandmother to suck eggs to presume to teach someone something that he knows already
  10. with egg on one's face informal.
    with egg on one's face made to look ridiculous


verb

  1. to dip (food) in beaten egg before cooking
  2. informal.
    to throw eggs at

egg

2

/ ɛɡ /

verb

  1. trusually foll byon to urge or incite, esp to daring or foolish acts

egg

/ ĕg /

  1. The larger, usually nonmotile female reproductive cell of most organisms that reproduce sexually. Eggs are haploid (they have half the number of chromosomes as the other cells in the organism's body). During fertilization, the nucleus of an egg cell fuses with the nucleus of a sperm cell (the male reproductive cell) to form a new diploid organism. In animals, eggs are spherical, covered by a membrane, and usually produced by the ovaries. In some simple aquatic animals, eggs are fertilized and develop outside the body. In some terrestrial animals, such as insects, reptiles and birds, eggs are fertilized inside the body but are incubated outside the body, protected by durable, waterproof membranes (shells) until the young hatch. In mammals, eggs produced in the ovaries are fertilized inside the body and (except in the cases of monotremes) develop in the reproductive tract until birth. The human female fetus possesses all of the eggs that she will ever have; every month after the onset of puberty, one of these eggs matures and is released from the ovary into the fallopian tube, where it is either fertilized or discarded during menstruation. In many plants (such as the bryophytes, ferns, and gymnosperms) eggs are produced by flasked-shaped structures known as archegonia. In gymnosperms and angiosperms, eggs are enclosed within ovules. In angiosperms, the ovules are enclosed within ovaries.
  2. See also oogenesis
  3. In many animals, a structure consisting of this reproductive cell together with nutrients and often a protective covering. The embryo develops within this structure if the reproductive cell is fertilized. The egg is often laid outside the body, but the female of ovoviviparous species may keep it inside the body until after hatching.


egg

  1. A female gamete .


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Pronunciation Note

Egg, like beg, leg, and other words where “short e” precedes a “hard g” sound, is pronounced with the vowel [e] of bet and let, except in parts of New England and the South Midland and southern U.S., where these words are frequently said with [-eyg], to rhyme with vague and plague, especially in the speech of the less educated. This raising of [e] to a higher vowel [ey], articulated with the upper surface of the tongue closer to the palate, also occurs before [zh], as in measure, pleasure, and treasure.

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Other Words From

  • eggless adjective
  • eggy adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of egg1

First recorded before 900; Middle English eg(ge), from Old Norse egg; replacing Middle English ey, aig, Old English ǣg, German Ei; akin to Latin ōvum, Greek ōión “egg”

Origin of egg2

First recorded in 1150–1200; Middle English eggen, from Old Norse eggja “to incite, urge on,” derivative of egg edge

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Word History and Origins

Origin of egg1

C14: from Old Norse egg; related to Old English ǣg, Old High German ei

Origin of egg2

Old English eggian, from Old Norse eggja to urge; related to Old English ecg edge , Middle Low German eggen to harrow

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Idioms and Phrases

Idioms
  1. egg on one's face, Informal. humiliation or embarrassment resulting from having said or done something foolish or unwise:

    They were afraid to back the losing candidate and wind up with egg on their faces.

  2. lay an egg, Informal. to fail wretchedly, especially to be unsuccessful in front of an audience:

    He laid an egg as the romantic hero.

  3. put all one's eggs in one basket, to venture all of something that one possesses in a single enterprise.
  4. walk on eggs, to walk or act very cautiously.

More idioms and phrases containing egg

  • bad egg
  • good egg
  • goose egg
  • kill the goose that lays the golden eggs
  • lay an egg
  • put all one's eggs in one basket
  • walk on eggs

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Example Sentences

The tortilla and hash browns provide a nice boost of carb-based energy, while the eggs and cheese round things out with protein and fat.

Finally, stack your eggadilla on a tortilla, with a layer of cheese on the bottom, your egg and veg in the middle, and another layer of cheese on top, and then add the second tortilla.

Last year was a landmark one for the industry, according to Caroline Bushnell, director of corporate engagement for the Good Food Institute, a nonprofit that promotes alternatives to traditional meat, dairy and eggs.

Her supervisors would egg her on to keep drinking, even when they knew she had a low tolerance for alcohol, she said.

Truthfully, separating eggs takes a little practice and a willingness to accept that you may not be successful 100 percent of the time.

Creating PGCs from skin tissue, on the other hand, seems like a walk in the park compared to egg freezing.

Egg-laying hens are placed in cages to unnaturally churn out egg after egg.

We happily hoist our egg nog in the air, embrace each other, and raise our out-of-tune voices in song.

Brush the pastry with egg wash and sprinkle with fleur de sel and pepper.

Place a pastry circle over each bowl, adhering it with the egg wash.

Almost as soon as she had finished building her nest she had discovered a strange-looking egg there.

Wright's stain gives the nucleus a deep purple color and the cytoplasm a pale robin's-egg blue in typical cells.

The cytoplasm of lymphocytes is generally robin's-egg blue; that of the large mononuclears may have a faint bluish tinge.

Chloride of Lime … bad smell … bad egg … white of egg … fowl … grain … flour … flour and water … milk fluid … milk.

Carbolic Acid … liquid … oil … sweet oil … castor oil … aperient … Epsom Salts … white … white of egg.

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Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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