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elision

[ih-lizh-uh n]
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noun
  1. the omission of a vowel, consonant, or syllable in pronunciation.
  2. (in verse) the omission of a vowel at the end of one word when the next word begins with a vowel, as th'orient.
  3. an act or instance of eliding or omitting anything.
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Origin of elision

1575–85; < Latin ēlīsiōn- (stem of ēlīsiō) a striking out, equivalent to ēlīs(us) (past participle of ēlīdere; see elide) + -iōn- -ion
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words

exclusioncarelessnesslapsefailingbreachoversightrecessionshrinkagereductiondecreasedeflationinadvertenceneglectskiplackslipchasmoverlookwithholdingpreclusion

Examples from the Web for elision

Historical Examples

  • And when this Elision is proper, and when not, the Ear is a sufficient Judge.

    The Preface to the Aeneis of Virgil (1718)

    Joseph Trapp

  • In these English hexameters I have used and advocate the use of Miltonic elision.

  • Elision marks indicate that parts of this letter are omitted.

    Benjamin Franklin

    Frank Luther Mott

  • Otsataga, by elision, readily becomes Otstaga, and again Ostaga.

  • The elision is not a happy one, and the mere suppression of the "and" does not produce a satisfying line.


British Dictionary definitions for elision

elision

noun
  1. the omission of a syllable or vowel at the beginning or end of a word, esp when a word ending with a vowel is next to one beginning with a vowel
  2. any omission of a part or parts
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Word Origin

C16: from Latin ēlīsiō, from ēlīdere to elide
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for elision

n.

1580s, from Latin elisionem (nominative elisio) "a striking out," noun of action from past participle stem of elidere (see elide).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper