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View synonyms for embryo

embryo

1

[ em-bree-oh ]

noun

, plural em·bry·os.
  1. the young of a viviparous animal, especially of a mammal, in the early stages of development within the womb, in humans up to the end of the second month. Compare fetus.
  2. the rudimentary plant usually contained in the seed.
  3. any multicellular animal in a developmental stage preceding birth or hatching.
  4. the beginning or rudimentary stage of anything:

    He charged that the party policy was socialism in embryo.



adjective

embryo-

2
  1. a combining form representing embryo in compound words:

    embryology.

embryo

/ ˈɛmbrɪˌəʊ /

noun

  1. an animal in the early stages of development following cleavage of the zygote and ending at birth or hatching
  2. See fetus
    the human product of conception up to approximately the end of the second month of pregnancy Compare fetus
  3. a plant in the early stages of development: in higher plants, the plumule, cotyledons, and radicle within the seed
  4. an undeveloped or rudimentary state (esp in the phrase in embryo )
  5. something in an early stage of development

    an embryo of an idea



embryo

/ ĕmbrē-ō′ /

  1. An animal in its earliest stage of development, before all the major body structures are represented. In humans, the embryonic stage lasts through the first eight weeks of pregnancy. In humans, other placental mammals, and other viviparous animals, young born as embryos cannot thrive. In marsupials, the young are born during the embryonic stage and complete their development outside the uterus, attached to a teat within the mother's pouch.
  2. The developing young of an egg-laying animal before hatching.
  3. The sporophyte of a plant in its earliest stages of development, such as the miniature, partially developed plant contained within a seed before germination.


embryo

  1. A developing plant or animal. A plant embryo is an undeveloped plant inside a seed. An animal embryo is the animal as it develops from the single cell of the zygote until birth. Among humans and most other mammals , the embryo is carried in the mother's womb.


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Notes

The term is occasionally used to denote a new or developing idea or project: “The idea for the complete theory was already present in his work, in embryo form, in 1950.”

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Derived Forms

  • ˈembryˌoid, adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of embryo1

First recorded in 1580–90; from Medieval Latin embryo, embryon-, from Greek émbryon, noun use of neuter of émbryos “ingrowing,” equivalent to em- “in” + bry- (stem of brýein “to swell”) + -os adjective suffix; em- 2

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Word History and Origins

Origin of embryo1

C16: from Late Latin, from Greek embruon, from bruein to swell

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Example Sentences

A female-founded Israeli startup called Embryonics is setting out to change this by using artificial intelligence to screen embryos.

Gene changes, or mutations, seen in the newly studied twins suggest that embryos don’t split neatly in half when twins form.

Of those, 38 pairs were genetic duplicates of each other, but most had some differences in DNA that probably arose very early in development, either just before one embryo split to form two or shortly after the split.

Because the mother worm contributes the same number of proteins to every embryo, small embryos have high concentrations of proteins and large embryos have low concentrations.

In any case, Keenan said he’s confident that the 27-year-old embryo will not be the oldest ever brought to a live birth.

Three years later Sophia goes back to the clinic, where they repeat the IVF process and transfer a single normal female embryo.

Almost all 35 to 39-year-old women—92 percent—had at least one normal embryo to transfer after a single IVF cycle.

It is this uncertainty that drives many religious objectors: they protest if there is any chance an embryo could be harmed.

The intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance role was in the embryo stage.

Doctors bypass the tubes and place the embryo right in the womb.

The embryo can be located by the commotion which its active motion produces among the corpuscles.

They are asymmetrically oval, about 50 in length, and often contain a partially developed embryo.

And, lastly, that at the apex of the nucleus the radicle of the future Embryo would constantly be found.

On these grounds my opinion respecting the Embryo of Cephalotus was formed.

In such cases the external umbilicus alone affords a certain indication of the position of the future embryo.

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embryectomyembryogeny