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enclosure

[ en-kloh-zher ]
/ ɛnˈkloʊ ʒər /
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See synonyms for: enclosure / enclosures on Thesaurus.com

noun
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Also in·clo·sure [in-kloh-zher] /ɪnˈkloʊ ʒər/ .

Origin of enclosure

First recorded in 1530–40; enclose + -ure; compare Anglo-French enclosure

OTHER WORDS FROM enclosure

non·en·clo·sure, nounpre·en·clo·sure, nounsem·i·en·clo·sure, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use enclosure in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for enclosure

enclosure

inclosure

/ (ɪnˈkləʊʒə) /

noun
the act of enclosing or state of being enclosed
a region or area enclosed by or as if by a fence
  1. the act of appropriating land, esp common land, by putting a hedge or other barrier around it
  2. history such acts as were carried out at various periods in England, esp between the 12th and 14th centuries and finally in the 18th and 19th centuries
a fence, wall, etc, that serves to enclose
something, esp a supporting document, enclosed within an envelope or wrapper, esp together with a letter
British a section of a sports ground, racecourse, etc, allotted to certain spectators
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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