enter

[ en-ter ]
/ ˈɛn tər /

verb (used without object)

verb (used with object)

Verb Phrases

enter into,
  1. to participate in; engage in.
  2. to investigate; consider: We will enter into the question of inherited characteristics at a future time.
  3. to sympathize with; share in.
  4. to form a constituent part or ingredient of: There is another factor that enters into the situation.
  5. to go into a particular state: to enter into a state of suspended animation.

QUIZZES

WHO SAID IT: A QUIZ ON PRESIDENTIAL WIT AND WISDOM

Think you know your presidents? Take this quiz and see if you can match the style, wit, and ideology of these memorable lines to the right POTUS.
Question 1 of 9
“I do believe that the buck stops here, that I cannot rely upon public opinion polls to tell me what is right. I do believe that right makes might and that if I am wrong, 10 angels swearing I was right would make no difference.”

Origin of enter

1200–50; Middle English entren<Old French entrer<Latin intrāre to enter, derivative of intrā within

OTHER WORDS FROM enter

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH enter

enter , inter

Definition for enter (2 of 2)

enter-

variant of entero- before a vowel: enteritis.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for enter

enter
/ (ˈɛntə) /

verb

Derived forms of enter

enterable, adjectiveenterer, noun

Word Origin for enter

C13: from Old French entrer, from Latin intrāre to go in, from intrā within
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for enter

enter-

pref.

Variant ofentero-
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.