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enter

[ en-ter ]
/ ˈɛn tər /
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See synonyms for: enter / entered / entering / enterable on Thesaurus.com

verb (used without object)
verb (used with object)
Verb Phrases
enter into,
  1. to participate in; engage in.
  2. to investigate; consider: We will enter into the question of inherited characteristics at a future time.
  3. to sympathize with; share in.
  4. to form a constituent part or ingredient of: There is another factor that enters into the situation.
  5. to go into a particular state: to enter into a state of suspended animation.
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Origin of enter

1200–50; Middle English entren<Old French entrer<Latin intrāre to enter, derivative of intrā within

OTHER WORDS FROM enter

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH enter

enter , inter

Other definitions for enter (2 of 2)

enter-

variant of entero- before a vowel: enteritis.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

WORDS THAT USE ENTER-

What does enter- mean?

Enter- is a combining form used like a prefix meaning “intestine.” The intestines are the long tract of the digestive system that runs from the stomach to the anus. Enter- is often used in medical terms, especially in anatomy and pathology.

Enter- comes from the Greek énteron, meaning “intestine.” A scientific term for the digestive tract (alimentary canal) is enteron, which comes from this same Greek root. The word dysentery, literally meaning “bad bowels,” also derives from the Greek énteron.

Enter- is a variant of entero-, which loses its –o– when combined with words or word elements beginning with vowels.

Want to know more? Read our Words That Use entero- article.

Examples of enter-

One medical term that features the combining form enter- is enteritis, meaning “inflammation of the intestines.”

As we have seen, enter- means “intestine.” The suffix -itis is used to denote inflammation, particularly of organs. So, enteritis literally translates to “intestine inflammation.”

What are some words that use the combining form enter-?

What are some other forms that enter– may be commonly confused with?

The combining form enter- shares all its letters with the common word enter, meaning “to come or go in.” Via French, enter ultimately comes from the Latin intrā, meaning “within”—and intrā is, in fact, distantly related to the Greek énteron. Our guts are within our bodies, after all.

Break it down!

The combining form -algia means “pain.” With this in mind, what is enteralgia?

How to use enter in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for enter

enter
/ (ˈɛntə) /

verb

Derived forms of enter

enterable, adjectiveenterer, noun

Word Origin for enter

C13: from Old French entrer, from Latin intrāre to go in, from intrā within
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for enter

enter-

pref.
Variant ofentero-
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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