ethanolamine

[ eth-uh-nol-uh-meen, -noh-luh-, -nuh-lam-in ]
/ ˌɛθ əˈnɒl əˌmin, -ˈnoʊ lə-, -nəˈlæm ɪn /

noun Chemistry.

a viscous liquid with an odor of ammonia, C2H7NO, used to remove carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from natural gas, and in the manufacture of antibiotics.

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Also called colamine.

Origin of ethanolamine

First recorded in 1895–1900; ethanol + amine
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Scientific definitions for ethanolamine

ethanolamine
[ ĕth′ə-nŏlə-mēn′, -nōlə- ]

A colorless liquid used in the purification of petroleum, as a solvent in dry cleaning, and as an ingredient in paints and pharmaceuticals. Chemical formula: C2H7NO.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.