exponent

[ik-spoh-nuhnt, ek-spoh-nuhnt]
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noun
  1. a person or thing that expounds, explains, or interprets: an exponent of modern theory in the arts.
  2. a person or thing that is a representative, advocate, type, or symbol of something: Lincoln is an exponent of American democracy.
  3. Mathematics. a symbol or number placed above and after another symbol or number to denote the power to which the latter is to be raised: The exponents of the quantities xn, 2m, y4, and 35 are, respectively, n, m, 4, and 5.

Origin of exponent

1575–85; < Latin expōnent- (stem of expōnēns), present participle of expōnere to expound; see -ent

Synonyms for exponent

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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for exponent

Contemporary Examples of exponent

Historical Examples of exponent

  • The exponent of Rousseau was ofttimes "long preaching," like St. Paul.

    In the Heart of Vosges

    Matilda Betham-Edwards

  • The popular type and exponent of obstinacy is the mule, a most intelligent animal.

  • Only, the forest-runner, by long use, has raised the exponent of his powers.

    The Forest

    Stewart Edward White

  • Francesca Caccini was an exponent of the first growth of opera.

  • Afterward she had simply become in memory the exponent of an ideal.

    Bonaventure

    George Washington Cable


British Dictionary definitions for exponent

exponent

noun
  1. (usually foll by of) a person or thing that acts as an advocate (of an idea, cause, etc)
  2. a person or thing that explains or interprets
  3. a performer or interpretive artist, esp a musician
  4. Also called: power, index maths a number or variable placed as a superscript to the right of another number or quantity indicating the number of times the number or quantity is to be multiplied by itself
adjective
  1. offering a declaration, explanation, or interpretation

Word Origin for exponent

C16: from Latin expōnere to set out, expound, from pōnere to set, place
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for exponent
n.

1706, from Latin exponentem (nominative exponens), present participle of exponere "put forth" (see expound). A mathematical term at first; the sense of "one who expounds" is 1812. As an adjective, from 1580s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

exponent in Science

exponent

[ĕkspō′nənt, ĭk-spōnənt]
  1. A number or symbol, placed above and to the right of the expression to which it applies, that indicates the number of times the expression is used as a factor. For example, the exponent 3 in 53 indicates 5 X 5 X 5; the exponent x in (a + b)x indicates (a + b) multiplied by itself x times.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

exponent in Culture

exponent

A number placed above and to the right of another number to show that it has been raised to a power. For example, 32 indicates that 3 has been raised to a power of 2, or multiplied by itself; 32 is equal to 9.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.