extrinsic

[ ik-strin-sik, -zik ]
/ ɪkˈstrɪn sɪk, -zɪk /

adjective

not essential or inherent; not a basic part or quality; extraneous: facts that are extrinsic to the matter under discussion.
being outside a thing; outward or external; operating or coming from without: extrinsic influences.
Anatomy. (of certain muscles, nerves, etc.) originating outside the anatomical limits of a part.

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Also Archaic, ex·trin·si·cal .

Origin of extrinsic

First recorded in 1535–45; from Late Latin extrinsecus “outward,” adjective use of Latin extrinsecus (adverb) “on the outward side,” equivalent to extrim- (ext(e)r “outer” (see exterior) + -im adverb suffix) + secus “beside” (derivative of sequī “to follow”)

OTHER WORDS FROM extrinsic

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH extrinsic

extraneous, external, extrinsic
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for extrinsic

British Dictionary definitions for extrinsic

extrinsic
/ (ɛkˈstrɪnsɪk) /

adjective

not contained or included within; extraneous
originating or acting from outside; external

Derived forms of extrinsic

extrinsically, adverb

Word Origin for extrinsic

C16: from Late Latin extrinsecus (adj) outward, from Latin (adv) from without, on the outward side, from exter outward + secus alongside, related to sequī to follow
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for extrinsic

extrinsic
[ ĭk-strĭnsĭk, -zĭk ]

adj.

Of or relating to an organ or structure, especially a muscle, originating outside of the part where it is found or upon which it acts; adventitious.

Other words from extrinsic

ex•trinsi•cal•ly adv.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.