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fame

[feym]
See more synonyms for fame on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. widespread reputation, especially of a favorable character; renown; public eminence: to seek fame as an opera singer.
  2. common estimation or opinion generally held of a person or thing; reputation.
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verb (used with object), famed, fam·ing.
  1. Archaic. to have or spread the renown of; to make famous.
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Origin of fame

1175–1225; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin fāma talk, public opinion, repute, akin to fārī to speak
Related formsfame·less, adjectiveout·fame, verb (used with object), out·famed, out·fam·ing.self-fame, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for fame

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • "I am satisfied with the pursuit of wisdom, not with the fame of it," replied the sage.

    Philothea

    Lydia Maria Child

  • The fame of the Nile valley must have spread at an early date.

    Ancient Man

    Hendrik Willem van Loon

  • He has made a speech, and dedicated it to German fame for ever.

  • Your squires are doubtless worthy the fame of their masters.

    The White Company

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • But to have been Caesar's mistress was Cleopatra's chief title to fame.


British Dictionary definitions for fame

fame

noun
  1. the state of being widely known or recognized; renown; celebrity
  2. archaic rumour or public report
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verb
  1. (tr; now usually passive) to make known or famous; celebratehe was famed for his ruthlessness
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Derived Formsfamed, adjective

Word Origin

C13: from Latin f ā ma report; related to fārī to say
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for fame

n.

early 13c., "character attributed to someone;" late 13c., "celebrity, renown," from Old French fame "fame, reputation, renown, rumor," from Latin fama "talk, rumor, report, reputation," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say" (cf. Sanskrit bhanati "speaks;" Latin fari "to say," fabula "narrative, account, tale, story;" Armenian ban, bay "word, term;" Old Church Slavonic bajati "to talk, tell;" Old English boian "to boast," ben "prayer, request;" Greek pheme "talk," phone "voice, sound," phanai "to speak;" Old Irish bann "law").

The goddess Fama was the personification of rumor in Roman mythology. The Latin derivative fabulare was the colloquial word for "speak, talk" since the time of Plautus, whence Spanish hablar.

I've always been afraid I was going to tap the world on the shoulder for 20 years, and when it finally turned around I was going to forget what I had to say. [Tom Waits, "Playboy" magazine interview, March, 1988]
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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper