fin

1
[ fin ]
/ fɪn /

noun

verb (used with object), finned, fin·ning.

to cut off the fins from (a fish); carve or cut up, as a chub.
to provide or equip with a fin or fins.

verb (used without object), finned, fin·ning.

to move the fins; lash the water with the fins, as a whale when dying.

Origin of fin

1
before 1000; Middle English, Old English finn; cognate with Dutch vin, Low German finne; akin to Swedish fena
Related formsfin·less, adjectivefin·like, adjective

Definition for fin (2 of 5)

fin

2
[ fin ]
/ fɪn /

noun

Slang. a five-dollar bill.

Origin of fin

2
1865–70; earlier finnip, finnup, fin(n)if(f) a five-pound note < Yiddish fin(e)f five < Middle High German vumf, vimf; see five

Definition for fin (3 of 5)

Definition for fin (4 of 5)

Definition for fin (5 of 5)

ad fin.


Latin.

to, toward, or at the end.

Origin of ad fin.

ad fīnem
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for fin

British Dictionary definitions for fin (1 of 5)

fin

1
/ (fɪn) /

noun

verb fins, finning or finned

Derived Formsfinless, adjective

Word Origin for fin

Old English finn; related to Middle Dutch vinne, Old Swedish fina, Latin pinna wing

British Dictionary definitions for fin (2 of 5)

fin

2
/ (fɪn) /

noun

US slang a five-dollar bill

Word Origin for fin

from Yiddish finf five, ultimately from Old High German funf, finf

British Dictionary definitions for fin (3 of 5)

Fin


abbreviation for

Finland
Finnish

British Dictionary definitions for fin (4 of 5)

FIN


abbreviation for

Finland (international car registration)

British Dictionary definitions for fin (5 of 5)

fin.


abbreviation for

finance
financial
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for fin

fin


n.

Old English finn, from Proto-Germanic *finno (cf. Middle Low German vinne, Dutch vin), perhaps from Latin pinna "feather, wing" (see pin (n.)); or, less likely, from Latin spina "thorn, spine" (see spike (n.1)).

U.S. underworld slang sense of "$5 bill" is 1925, from Yiddish finif "five," from German fünf (see five) and thus unrelated. The same word had been used in England 1868 to mean "five pound note" (earlier finnip, 1839).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Science definitions for fin

fin

[ fĭn ]

One of the winglike or paddlelike parts of a fish, dolphin, or whale that are used for propelling, steering, and balancing in water.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.