flicker

1
[ flik-er ]
/ ˈflɪk ər /

verb (used without object)

verb (used with object)

to cause to flicker.

noun


Nearby words

  1. flichter,
  2. flick,
  3. flick knife,
  4. flick-knife,
  5. flick-pass,
  6. flickertail,
  7. flickertail state,
  8. flics,
  9. flied,
  10. flier

Origin of flicker

1
before 1000; Middle English flikeren (v.) Old English flicorian to flutter; cognate with Dutch flikkeren

Related formsflick·er·ing·ly, adverbflick·er·y, adjectiveun·flick·er·ing, adjectiveun·flick·er·ing·ly, adverb

flicker

2
[ flik-er ]
/ ˈflɪk ər /

noun

any of several American woodpeckers of the genus Colaptes, having the underside of the wings and tail brightly marked with yellow or red and noted for taking insects from the ground as well as trees.

Origin of flicker

2
An Americanism dating back to 1800–10; said to be imitative of the bird's note

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for flicker


British Dictionary definitions for flicker

flicker

1
/ (ˈflɪkə) /

verb

(intr) to shine with an unsteady or intermittent lighta candle flickers
(intr) to move quickly to and fro; quiver, flutter, or vibrate
(tr) to cause to flicker

noun

Derived Formsflickeringly, adverbflickery, adjective

Word Origin for flicker

Old English flicorian; related to Dutch flikkeren, Old Norse flökra to flutter

noun

any North American woodpecker of the genus Colaptes, esp C. auratus (yellow-shafted flicker), which has a yellow undersurface to the wings and tail

Word Origin for flicker

C19: perhaps imitative of the bird's call

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for flicker
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper