flounce

1
[ flouns ]
/ flaʊns /

verb (used without object), flounced, flounc·ing.

to go with impatient or impetuous, exaggerated movements: The star flounced out of the studio in a rage.
to throw the body about spasmodically; flounder.

noun

an act or instance of flouncing; a flouncing movement.

Nearby words

  1. flotow,
  2. flotow, friedrich von,
  3. flotsam,
  4. flotsam and jetsam,
  5. flotus,
  6. flouncing,
  7. flouncy,
  8. flounder,
  9. flour,
  10. flour beetle

Origin of flounce

1
1535–45; of obscure origin; perhaps akin to Norwegian flunsa to hurry

flounce

2
[ flouns ]
/ flaʊns /

noun

a strip of material gathered or pleated and attached at one edge, with the other edge left loose or hanging: used for trimming, as on the edge of a skirt or sleeve or on a curtain, slipcover, etc.

verb (used with object), flounced, flounc·ing.

to trim with flounces.

Origin of flounce

2
First recorded in 1665–75; alteration of obsolete frounce wrinkle

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for flounce


British Dictionary definitions for flounce

flounce

1
/ (flaʊns) /

verb

(intr; often foll by about, away, out, etc) to move or go with emphatic or impatient movements

noun

the act of flouncing

Word Origin for flounce

C16: of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian flunsa to hurry, Swedish flunsa to splash

noun

an ornamental gathered ruffle sewn to a garment by its top edge

Word Origin for flounce

C18: from Old French fronce wrinkle, from froncir to wrinkle, of Germanic origin

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for flounce
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper