Dictionary.com

flume

[ floom ]
/ flum /
Save This Word!

noun
a deep narrow passage or mountain ravine with a stream flowing through it, often with great force: Hikers are warned to stay well clear of the flumes, especially during the spring thaw.
an artificial channel or trough for conducting water, as one used to transport logs or provide water power.
an amusement park ride in which passengers are carried in a boatlike or loglike conveyance through a narrow, water-filled chute or over a water slide.
verb (used with object), flumed, flum·ing.
to transport in a flume.
to divert (a stream) by a flume.
QUIZ
QUIZ YOURSELF ON AFFECT VS. EFFECT!
In effect, this quiz will prove whether or not you have the skills to know the difference between “affect” and “effect.”
Question 1 of 7
The rainy weather could not ________ my elated spirits on my graduation day.
Meet Grammar CoachWrite or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing
Meet Grammar CoachImprove Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of flume

First recorded in 1125–75; Middle English flum, from Old French, ultimately from Latin flūmen “river, stream”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use flume in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for flume

flume
/ (fluːm) /

noun
a ravine through which a stream flows
a narrow artificial channel made for providing water for power, floating logs, etc
a slide in the form of a long and winding tube with a stream of water running through it that descends into a purpose-built pool
verb
(tr) to transport (logs) in a flume

Word Origin for flume

C12: from Old French flum, ultimately from Latin flūmen stream, from fluere to flow
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK