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forefoot

[ fawr-foot, fohr- ]

noun

, plural fore·feet.
  1. Zoology. one of the front feet of a quadruped, an insect, etc.
  2. Nautical.
    1. the point at which the stem of a hull joins the keel; the forward end of a keel.
    2. a curved member at this point in a wooden hull.


forefoot

/ ˈfɔːˌfʊt /

noun

  1. either of the front feet of a quadruped
  2. nautical the forward end of the keel


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Word History and Origins

Origin of forefoot1

First recorded in 1325–75, forefoot is from the Middle English word forfot, forefote. See fore-, foot
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Example Sentences

In fact, another forthcoming study by Healey and Hoogkamer tested runners in regular Vaporflys and in Vaporflys with six parallel cuts through the carbon plate to eliminate any connection between the rearfoot and forefoot.

Women’s feet, says Saysh head of product Tiffany Beers, a former Nike product engineer, are typically narrower at the heel and wider at the forefoot than men’s feet, relative to the rest of the foot.

From Time

The Saysh One design includes a narrower heel than a typical running shoe, and a wider forefoot for a relaxed fit.

From Time

It has a single Boa closure with a forefoot strap, which differentiates it from the dual-dial systems on the three shoes above.

It needs to have some level of flexibility in the forefoot so that it allows the toes to bend at the level where they bend.

The effect of the alteration has been to lengthen the keel, and perhaps to round up the forefoot a little.

"Lift Pete's forefoot—the off one, Joe," she commanded, stepping down into the asphalt court.

Twenty minutes later he slid the gray canoe's forefoot up on a patch of sand before his house.

His galloping pony put a forefoot into a gopher hole, going down in a heap.

He could not even make out the phosphorescent water that curled out from the Maggie's forefoot.

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