formal

1
[ fawr-muh l ]
/ ˈfɔr məl /

adjective

noun

a dance, ball, or other social occasion that requires formalwear.
an evening gown.

adverb

in formal attire: We're supposed to go formal.

Origin of formal

1
1350–1400; Middle English formal, formel < Latin fōrmālis. See form, -al1

SYNONYMS FOR formal

2 Formal, academic, conventional may have either favorable or unfavorable implications. Formal may mean in proper form, or may imply excessive emphasis on empty form. In the favorable sense, academic applies to scholars or higher institutions of learning; it may, however, imply slavish conformance to mere rules, or to belief in impractical theories. Conventional, in a favorable sense, applies to desirable conformity with accepted conventions or customs; but it more often is applied to arbitrary, forced, or meaningless conformity.
5 conforming, conformist.
6 punctilious.
8 official.

Related forms

for·mal·ness, noun

Definition for formal (2 of 2)

formal

2
[ fawr-mal ]
/ ˈfɔr mæl /

noun Chemistry.

Origin of formal

2
First recorded in 1895–1900; from formaldehyde
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for formal

British Dictionary definitions for formal (1 of 2)

formal

1
/ (ˈfɔːməl) /

adjective

Derived Forms

formally, adverbformalness, noun

Word Origin for formal

C14: from Latin formālis

British Dictionary definitions for formal (2 of 2)

formal

2
/ (ˈfɔːmæl) /

noun

another name for methylal

Word Origin for formal

C19: from form (ic) + -al ³
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012