fraught

[ frawt ]
/ frɔt /

adjective

full of, accompanied by, or involving something specified, usually something unpleasant (often followed by with): a task fraught with danger; her pain-fraught body;emotionally fraught lyrics;a gathering fraught with joyful sounds.
characterized by or causing tension or stress: He has always been overweight, so his relationship with food is fraught.We are living in fraught times.
Archaic. filled or laden: ships fraught with precious wares.

noun

Scot. a load; cargo; freight (of a ship).

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Origin of fraught

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German vracht “freight money, freight”; compare Old High German frēht “earnings,” Old English ǣht “possession”; see freight

OTHER WORDS FROM fraught

o·ver·fraught, adjectiveun·fraught, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for fraught

British Dictionary definitions for fraught

fraught
/ (frɔːt) /

adjective

(usually postpositive and foll by with) filled or charged; attendeda venture fraught with peril
informal showing or producing tension or anxietyshe looks rather fraught; a fraught situation
archaic (usually postpositive and foll by with) freighted

noun

an obsolete word for freight

Word Origin for fraught

C14: from Middle Dutch vrachten, from vracht freight
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012