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fricassee

[ frik-uh-see ]
/ ˌfrɪk əˈsi /
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noun

meat, especially chicken or veal, browned lightly, stewed, and served in a sauce made with its own stock.

verb (used with object), fric·as·seed, fric·as·see·ing.

to prepare as a fricassee.

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Origin of fricassee

1560–70; <Middle French, noun use of feminine past participle of fricasser to cook chopped food in its own juice, probably equivalent to fri(re) to fry1 + casser to break, crack (<Latin quassāre to shake, damage, batter); compare, however, dial. fricâssié, perhaps with a reflex of Vulgar Latin *coāctiāre, verbal derivative of Latin coāctus compressed, condensed, past participle of cōgere;see cogent

Words nearby fricassee

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use fricassee in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for fricassee

fricassee
/ (ˌfrɪkəˈsiː, ˈfrɪkəsɪ, ˈfrɪkəˌseɪ) /

noun

stewed meat, esp chicken or veal, and vegetables, served in a thick white sauce

verb -sees, -seeing or -seed

(tr) to prepare (meat) as a fricassee

Word Origin for fricassee

C16: from Old French, from fricasser to fricassee; probably related to frire to fry 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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