frown

[ froun ]
/ fraʊn /

verb (used without object)

verb (used with object)

to express by a frown: to frown one's displeasure.
to force or shame with a disapproving frown: to frown someone into silence.

noun

a frowning look; scowl.
any expression or show of disapproval: a tax bill that received Congressional frowns.

QUIZZES

WHO SAID IT: A QUIZ ON PRESIDENTIAL WIT AND WISDOM

Think you know your presidents? Take this quiz and see if you can match the style, wit, and ideology of these memorable lines to the right POTUS.
Question 1 of 9
“I do believe that the buck stops here, that I cannot rely upon public opinion polls to tell me what is right. I do believe that right makes might and that if I am wrong, 10 angels swearing I was right would make no difference.”

Origin of frown

1350–1400; Middle English frounen<Old French froignier, derivative of froigne surly expression, probably <Gaulish *frognā; compare Welsh ffroen,Old Breton fron nostril, Old Irish srón nose <Celtic *srognā or *sroknā

OTHER WORDS FROM frown

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for frown

British Dictionary definitions for frown

frown
/ (fraʊn) /

verb

(intr) to draw the brows together and wrinkle the forehead, esp in worry, anger, or concentration
(intr; foll by on or upon) to have a dislike (of); look disapprovingly (upon)the club frowned upon political activity by its members
(tr) to express (worry, etc) by frowning
(tr often foll by down) to force, silence, etc, by a frowning look

noun

the act of frowning
a show of dislike or displeasure

Derived forms of frown

frowner, nounfrowningly, adverb

Word Origin for frown

C14: from Old French froigner, of Celtic origin; compare Welsh ffroen nostril, Middle Breton froan
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012