fuller

1
[ foo l-er ]
/ ˈfʊl ər /

noun

a person who fulls cloth.

Nearby words

  1. full-time,
  2. full-timer,
  3. full-wave rectifier,
  4. fullam,
  5. fullback,
  6. fuller rose beetle,
  7. fuller's earth,
  8. fuller's teasel,
  9. fuller, george,
  10. fuller, margaret

Origin of fuller

1
before 1000; Middle English; Old English fullere < Latin fullō fuller; see -er1

fuller

2
[ foo l-er ]
/ ˈfʊl ər /

noun

a half-round hammer used for grooving and spreading iron.
a tool or part of a die for reducing the sectional area of a piece of work.
a groove running along the flat of a sword blade.

verb (used with object)

to reduce the sectional area of (a piece of metal) with a fuller or fullers.

Origin of fuller

2
1810–20; orig. noun, apparently full1 in sense to make full, close, compact + -er1

Fuller

[ foo l-er ]
/ ˈfʊl ər /

noun

George,1822–84, U.S. painter.
Henry B(lake),Stanton Page, 1857–1929, U.S. novelist, poet, and critic.
Melville Wes·ton [wes-tuh n] /ˈwɛs tən/, 1833–1910, chief justice of the U.S. 1888–1910.
R(ichard) Buckminster,1895–1983, U.S. engineer, designer, and architect.
(Sarah) MargaretMarchioness Ossoli, 1810–50, U.S. author and literary critic.
Thomas,1608–61, English clergyman and historian.

Origin of full

1
before 900; Middle English, Old English full, ful; cognate with Gothic fulls, Old Norse fullr, Old High German foll (German voll); akin to Latin plēnus, Greek plḗrēs

Related formsfull·ness, noun

Can be confusedfull fullness fulsome (see usage note at fulsome)

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for fuller


British Dictionary definitions for fuller

fuller

1
/ (ˈfʊlə) /

noun

a person who fulls cloth for his living

Word Origin for fuller

Old English fullere, from Latin fullō

noun

Also called: fullering tool a tool for forging a groove
a tool for caulking a riveted joint

verb

(tr) to forge (a groove) or caulk (a riveted joint) with a fuller

Word Origin for fuller

C19: perhaps from the name Fuller

Fuller

/ (ˈfʊlə) /

noun

(Richard) Buckminster . 1895–1983, US architect and engineer: developed the geodesic dome
Roy (Broadbent). 1912–91, British poet and writer, whose collections include The Middle of a War (1942) and A Lost Season (1944), both of which are concerned with World War II, Epitaphs and Occasions (1949), and Available for Dreams (1989)
Thomas . 1608–61, English clergyman and antiquarian; author of The Worthies of England (1662)
Derived Formsfullness or esp US fulness, noun

Word Origin for full

Old English; related to Old Norse fullr, Old High German foll, Latin plēnus, Greek plērēs; see fill

full

2
/ (fʊl) /

verb

(of cloth, yarn, etc) to become or to make (cloth, yarn, etc) heavier and more compact during manufacture through shrinking and beating or pressing

Word Origin for full

C14: from Old French fouler, ultimately from Latin fullō a fuller 1

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for fuller
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with fuller

full

In addition to the idioms beginning with full

  • full blast
  • full circle, come
  • full of beans
  • full of crap
  • full of hot air
  • full of it
  • full of oneself
  • full speed ahead
  • full swing
  • full tilt, at
  • full well

also see:

  • glass is half full
  • have one's hands full
  • in full swing
  • to the full

Also see underfill.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.