fungi

[ fuhn-jahy, fuhng-gahy ]
/ ˈfʌn dʒaɪ, ˈfʌŋ gaɪ /

plural noun

a plural of fungus.

QUIZZES

BECOME A PRO CHEF WITH THIS EXQUISITE CUISINE QUIZ!

Even if you can't be a professional chef, you can at least talk like one with this vocabulary quiz.
Question 1 of 9
You may have read the word "simmer" in a recipe or two, but what does it really mean?

Definition for fungi (2 of 3)

Fungi
[ fuhn-jahy, fuhng-gahy ]
/ ˈfʌn dʒaɪ, ˈfʌŋ gaɪ /

noun (used with a plural verb)Biology.

a taxonomic kingdom, or in some classification schemes a division of the kingdom Plantae, comprising all the fungus groups and sometimes also the slime molds.
Also called Mycota.

Origin of Fungi

From New Latin; see origin at fungus

Definition for fungi (3 of 3)

fungi-

a combining form representing fungus in compound words: fungicide.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for fungi

British Dictionary definitions for fungi (1 of 2)

fungi
/ (ˈfʌŋɡaɪ, ˈfʌndʒaɪ, ˈfʌndʒɪ) /

noun

a plural of fungus

British Dictionary definitions for fungi (2 of 2)

fungi-

before a vowel fung-


combining form

fungusfungicide; fungoid
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for fungi (1 of 2)

fungi
[ fŭnjī, fŭnggī ]

n.

Plural offungus

Medical definitions for fungi (2 of 2)

Fungi

n.

The kingdom of organisms that is made up of the fungi and includes the yeasts, molds, mildews, and mushrooms.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Cultural definitions for fungi

fungi
[ (fun-jeye, fung-geye) ]

sing. fungus

Plantlike organisms lacking chlorophyll, such as mushrooms, molds, yeasts, and mildews. Modern biologists tend to place fungi in their own kingdom, not in the plant kingdom, because they get their nutrients from other living things (or from the remains of living things that have died) rather than from photosynthesis. (See under “Medicine and Health.”)

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.