Origin of gang

1
1300–50; Middle English; Old English gang, gong manner of going, way, passage; cognate with Old High German gang, Old Norse gangr, Gothic gagg; cf. gang2

Definition for gang (2 of 2)

gang

2
[ gang ]
/ gæŋ /

verb (used without object) Chiefly Scot. and North England.

to walk or go.

Origin of gang

2
before 900; Middle English gangen, Old English gangan, gongan; cognate with Old High German gangan, Old Norse ganga, Gothic gaggan; cf. gang1, noun derivative from same base
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for gang

British Dictionary definitions for gang (1 of 3)

gang

1
/ (ɡæŋ) /

noun

verb

to form into, become part of, or act as a gang
(tr) electronics to mount (two or more components, such as variable capacitors) on the same shaft, permitting adjustment by a single control
See also gang up

Derived Forms

ganged, adjective

Word Origin for gang

Old English gang journey; related to Old Norse gangr, Old High German gang, Sanskrit jangha foot

British Dictionary definitions for gang (2 of 3)

gang

2
/ (ɡæŋ) /

verb

Scot to go

Word Origin for gang

Old English gangan to go 1

British Dictionary definitions for gang (3 of 3)

gang

3
/ (ɡæŋ) /

noun

a variant spelling of gangue
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with gang

gang


In addition to the idiom beginning with gang

  • gang up

also see:

  • like gangbusters
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.