gelation

1
[ je-ley-shuhn, juh- ]
/ dʒɛˈleɪ ʃən, dʒə- /

noun

solidification by cold; freezing.

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Origin of gelation

1
1850–55; <Latin gelātiōn- (stem of gelātiō) a freezing, equivalent to gelāt(us) (see gelatin) + -iōn--ion

Definition for gelation (2 of 2)

gelation2
[ je-ley-shuhn, juh- ]
/ dʒɛˈleɪ ʃən, dʒə- /

noun Physical Chemistry.

the process of gelling.

Origin of gelation

2
First recorded in 1910–15; gel + -ation
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for gelation

  • The kind of vessel in which gelation is induced varies widely in different factories.

    Animal Proteins|Hugh Garner Bennett
  • The effect on gelation is also illustrated by the change of viscosity of the sol with time.

    Animal Proteins|Hugh Garner Bennett
  • On the other hand, many gels cannot be reconverted into sols; that is, the "gelation" process is irreversible.

    The Chemistry of Plant Life|Roscoe Wilfred Thatcher

British Dictionary definitions for gelation (1 of 2)

gelation1
/ (dʒɪˈleɪʃən) /

noun

the act or process of freezing a liquid

Word Origin for gelation

C19: from Latin gelātiō a freezing; see gelatine

British Dictionary definitions for gelation (2 of 2)

gelation2
/ (dʒɪˈleɪʃən) /

noun

the act or process of forming into a gel

Word Origin for gelation

C20: from gel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for gelation

gelation
[ jĕ-lāshən ]

n.

Solidification by cooling or freezing.
The process of forming a gel.
Transformation of a sol into a gel.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.