gig

1
[gig]
|

noun

verb (used without object), gigged, gig·ging.

to ride in a gig.
to raise the nap on (a fabric).

Origin of gig

1
1200–50; Middle English gigge, gig flighty girl; akin to Danish gig top; compare Norwegian giga to shake about

gig

2
[gig]

noun

a device, commonly four hooks secured back to back, for dragging through a school of fish to hook them through the body.
a spearlike device with a long, thick handle, used for spearing fish and frogs.

verb (used with object), gigged, gig·ging.

to catch or spear (a fish or frog) with a gig.

verb (used without object), gigged, gig·ging.

to catch fish or frogs with a gig.

Origin of gig

2
1715–25; shortened from fishgig or fizgig

gig

3
[gig]

noun

an official report of a minor infraction of regulations, as in school or the army; a demerit.
a punishment for a minor infraction of rules.

verb (used with object), gigged, gig·ging.

to give a gig to or punish with a gig.

Origin of gig

3
First recorded in 1940–45; origin uncertain

gig

4
[gig]Slang.

noun

a single professional engagement, usually of short duration, as of jazz or rock musicians.
any job, especially one of short or uncertain duration: a teaching gig out west somewhere.

verb (used without object), gigged, gig·ging.

to work as a musician, especially in a single engagement: He gigged with some of the biggest names in the business.

Origin of gig

4
First recorded in 1925–30; origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for gigged

Contemporary Examples of gigged

Historical Examples of gigged

  • Well, the cloth is gigged there on the big machines the first thing after it leaves the fulling mills and washers.

    Under Fire

    Frank A. Munsey

  • After steaming, the cloth is thoroughly matted and gigged again, care being taken to avoid stirring up the ground nap.

    Textiles

    William H. Dooley

  • If this be true, I hope my goblet has gigged another golden goblet; and then they may carry double upon all four.


British Dictionary definitions for gigged

gig

1

noun

a light two-wheeled one-horse carriage without a hood
nautical a light tender for a vessel, often for the personal use of the captain
a long light rowing boat, used esp for racing
a machine for raising the nap of a fabric

verb gigs, gigging or gigged

(intr) to travel in a gig
(tr) to raise the nap of (fabric)

Word Origin for gig

C13 (in the sense: flighty girl, spinning top): perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish gig top, Norwegian giga to shake about

gig

2

noun

a cluster of barbless hooks drawn through a shoal of fish to try to impale them
short for fishgig

verb gigs, gigging or gigged

to catch (fish) with a gig

Word Origin for gig

C18: shortened from fishgig

gig

3

noun

a job, esp a single booking for a musician, comedian, etc, to perform at a concert or club
the performance itself

verb gigs, gigging or gigged

(intr) to perform at a gig or gigs

Word Origin for gig

C20: of unknown origin

gig

4

noun

informal short for gigabyte
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for gigged

gig

n.1

"light carriage, small boat," 1790, perhaps, on notion of bouncing, from Middle English ghyg "spinning top" (in whyrlegyg, mid-15c.), also "giddy girl" (early 13c., also giglet), from Old Norse geiga "turn sideways," or Danish gig "spinning top."

gig

n.2

"job," first used by jazz musicians, attested from 1915 but said to have been in use c.1905; of uncertain origin. As a verb, by 1939. Related: Gigged; gigging.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper